Very exciting, WordPress 4.0 Beta 1 is now available

WordPress has come a long ways from when it was created. It’s really exciting to see that WordPress 4.0 Beta 1 was announced this morning, can’t wait to start using it.

Here are some of the great features.

  • Previews of embedding via URLs in the visual editor and the “Insert from URL” tab in the media modal. Try pasting a URL (such as a WordPress.tv or YouTube video) onto its own line in the visual editor. (#28195, #15490)
  • The Media Library now has a “grid” view in addition to the existing list view. Clicking on an item takes you into a modal where you can see a larger preview and edit information about that attachment, and you can navigate between items right from the modal without closing it. (#24716)
  • We’re freshening up the plugin install experience. You’ll see some early visual changes as well as more information when searching for plugins and viewing details. (#28785, #27440)
  • Selecting a language when you run the installation process. (#28577)
  • The editor intelligently resizes and its top and bottom bars pin when needed. Browsers don’t like to agree on where to put things like cursors, so if you find a bug here, please also let us know your browser and operating system. (#28328)
  • We’ve made some improvements to how your keyboard and cursor interact with TinyMCE views such as the gallery preview. Much like the editor resizing and scrolling improvements, knowing about your setup is particularly important for bug reports here. (#28595)
  • Widgets in the Customizer are now loaded in a separate panel. (#27406)
  • We’ve also made some changes to some formatting functions, so if you see quotes curling in the wrong direction, please file a bug report.

Google Chrome Extensions that I Recommend [July 2014]

I’m an avid user of Google’s Chrome browser. It offers a ton of great extensions, but that also comes with a lot of bad extensions.

If you’re looking for some geeky, SEO and tech related Chrome extensions, here are some good ones that I trust.

How to setup an SSH tunnel to browse the web securely

I often have the need to encrypt my traffic when using a public Internet wifi, like at a university or a coffee shop. After scouring the web, I tried a few different tunnels, but this one really worked.

This tutorial is aimed at people using OS X on a Mac, but could easily work for any other operating system.

ssh -D 8080 -f -C -q -N username@serverIP

If you have a non-standard SSH port, just add -p to the end of the command.

First, I setup this command as a /usr/bin command so I don’t have to remember it.

sudo nano -w /usr/bin/createtunnel

cntrl +x
y
enter
sudo chmod +x /usr/bin/createtunnel

This will allow you to just enter “createtunnel” at the command line on your computer and it will start the process.

After you run the command it will prompt you for your SSH password so you can login to your server. This is the first part of the process.

The second part is ensuring that your wifi device is using the proxy port that you just setup.

Next, go to your device and then go to Proxies. Then select SOCKS Proxy and enter the 8080 port which is part of the command above. You can adjust this port to be whatever you want it to be, I just use 8080 for simplicity.

SSH tunnel on a Mac

After you click OK, your connection will now be tunneling your traffic through your encrypted SSH connection.

If you have any comments or suggestions, please let me know in the comments below.